FlemingMethod (FMTVDM)

Finding Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) isn't a matter of finding narrowing inside the arteries but rather the inability of the arteries to relax and carry more blood flow.

Only later in the disease of our arteries does the Inflammation push into the area where our blood flows (lumen). By then it may be too late. Half of all people find out they have heart disease by dropping dead from it.

As the following drawing shows, the damage begins on the inner wall of the heart called the endocardium and spreads outward to the epicardium. Initially this damage may only show up by blood work (enzymes). Later it shows up on the Electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG).

The inability to increase blood flow on demand can be found using Nuclear Imaging (tests of function - physiology). These changes can be accurately measured using FlemingMethod (FMTVDM), finding problems sooner.

Using FlemingMethod each person's individual treatment benefit or treatment failure can be accurately measured.
Clean.png
References.png

Research Development of FlemingMethod (FMTVDM) took almost Two Decades.

In 2011 FlemingMethod was presented in Two 1-hour Presentations at the Society of Nuclear Medicine Conference.

One of the accompanying Poster Presentations following the Oral Presentation is
Shown Below.

2011 SNM Meetings copy.jpg

The Following Year We Presented Additional Research Findings for FlemingMethod (FMTVDM).

Cardiologists from Keimyung University of South Korea Confirmed The Redistribution of Technetium Isotopes Using FlemingMethod.

These Cardiologists Confirmed Finding Heart Disease in 40% of Their Patients Using FlemingMethod.  The Patient's Heart Disease was Missed Using the Conventional Method.

The following Poster Session Show the Results of the Keimyung Cardiologists.

2012 South Koreans Confirm FlemingMethod for Heart Disease.jpg

In 2018 Immediately Prior to COVID-19 We Presented Further Research at the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Conference Follow Up Information Showing the use of FlemingMethod to not Only Find Heart Disease Sooner but the Ability to Measure Both Anatomy (Structure) and Physiology (Function).

2018 ASNC Conference.jpg